MYP IB Curriculum
Grade: 6
Time: 10 sessions

Inspired by artwork “Whose Values?” by contemporary artist Barbara Kruger, students discussed what a healthy community meant in order to understand how to deal with bullying situations and potentially neutralize them. They designed cardboard signs (layout and message) that later were used to perform a march around the school during recess time. By doing this, students had the opportunity to discuss with other peers about the importance of good attitudes to build a positive environment at school. They also visited different grades to share their message. The activities in this lesson were collaborative brainstorming, discussion about artworks in connection to the main theme, art, and design principles, as well as a typography workshop.  The IB lines of Inquiry incorporated into this lesson plan were:

– Perspective: How do positive/negative attitudes in the school context change us?
– Form: What is a positive/negative attitude towards other classmates?
– Change: How have you experienced negative/positive attitudes in the school context?

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PYP IB Curriculum
Interdisciplinary theme: “Sharing the Planet”
Grade: 2-3
Time: 8 sessions

How can we re-use materials for different purposes? During this lesson, students from second and third grade, used recycled materials to make a sculpture that represents an animal, environment threatened by human-made pollution. The goal was to develop an understanding that the choice of different tools and materials results in different outcomes. The United Nations Sustainable Goals discussed during the lesson were: “Responsible Consumption and Production”, “Life on Land” and “Life Below Water”. Artists references included: Natsumi Tomita, Haiti Sculptures, Torres Garcia, Karel Appel. The lines of Inquiry incorporated into this lesson plan were:

  • Function: How can we use recycled materials to make art?
  • Causation: Why are the oceans being polluted? 
  • Responsibility: What choices artists make to encourage responsible consumption and preserve life on land and below water?The summative assessment consisted of a sketch from an endangered animal and a sculpture.



Students collecting trash from trash containers they made after the art theory lesson and placed in different places around the school.

trash monster


Student sketch illustrating how animals in the ocean are affected by plastic waste


“Blue Whale” Sculpture from student


“Dolphin” Sculpture from student


“Baby Ray Manta” Sculpture from student


Student sketch


“Baby bird” Sculpture from student


“Dolphin” Sculpture from student



PYP IB Curriculum
Interdisciplinary theme: “How the World Works”
Grade: 5
Time: 12 sessions

Inspired by the media, world heroes, gods and comics, students designed their own comic superhero and made the character’s mask as a visual response to the impact of consumerism and contamination. They explored issues of identity, cultural heritage and contemporary art to create awareness about the importance of a fair use of resources in a globalized context while discussing how power is structured in the world in relation to the profit made out of the natural world and technology.  They applied the technique of mask making using recycled materials. During this unit of inquiry, students discussed content questions such as:

  • Why do we use/take/store energy to make the world work?
  • What “masks” humans use to express ideas about how the world works? Why?
  • Why do superheroes need to fix the world? What’s a superhero?

Meet the Superheroes


Vocabulary and “gut” reactions about “Man” comic video by artist Steve Cut


Students made their own sketchbooks to document their creative process


Mask making process


Exploratory class to learn the 7 elements of art


Initial Brainstorming

Spanish Artistic Baccalaureate Curriculum
Grade: 12
Time: 3 months project

Students from high-school addressed the questions of “What’s Globalization?” and “How did image and sound changed our perception of reality?” The central focus of this lesson is to encourage students to work as social researchers and artists using their own experiences and critical thinking skills, to create an animation project based on the data they collect from their social contexts. Students worked collaboratively to discuss the overarching questions. Later, each student developed an individual question addressing different themes such as consumerism, environment, social networks, modern slavery. Students collected information starting from their own personal experiences, as well as, their community members such as friends, family, students and teachers. As a result, students elaborated a script, a storyboard, a research artist-book and an animation project. They used chalk drawing techniques, photography and edition applications. This project has been presented to the school community using the art classroom as an open studio, in which, the Smart board functioned as a movie screen. The animations short films have also specific artists music such as “Society” (Eddie Vedder), “Of Monsters And Men” (Dirty Paws) among other musicians. Also, before showing the animations, each student presented their findings to the audience. (The music has been removed from this page to respect authorship copyright policies)

Students’ Animations (Selection)

Project Research


Animation Backstage


Spanish Artistic Baccalaureate
Grade: 11
Time: 12 sessions

The central focus of this lesson is to inspire critical thinking about the students’ role as consumers while addressing the question of: Where does water in Valencia comes from/goes? Students analyzed the natural water cycle with and the water consumption and commercialization. As a visual response, students created a serie of photographies inspired by the work of the photographer Sebastiao Salgado shown in “The Salt of Earth” (2015), a documentary by Wim Wenders. During this lesson, students also created an Instagram account, a newsletter and an exhibition title and individual statements.

Creative process and democratic rules to find a common theme for the research and exhibition


Students’ Works (selection)





Students curating the exhibition.


MYP IB Baccalaureate
Theme: Art as Message
Grade: 7
Time: 12 sessions

During this unit, students addressed one of the most important United Nations sustainable development goals: Climate Change. They analyzed the impact of climate change in their homeland, their role as consumers and used art in order to develop a visual response answering the questions of “How are you connected to Nature?” as well as “How does Climate Change affect you?”. They learned how to use Photoshop and created digital collage and double exposure compositions. Other students decided to work with illustration and paper collage. Students also sent a postcard to the United Nations using their statements to reach a wider audience.


Students analyze and compare how artists used and were inspired by nature to create their artworks.



Brainstorming technique used to connect the theme with their cultural backgrounds.


Students watched and discussed Michael Jackson’s “Earth Song” music video to get some visual inspiration.




Students chose the technique they wanted to used in their artworks.



“To protect ourselves we must protect nature” Student Artwork


“Don’t forget to protect the animals, they also suffer” Student Artwork


“We move as part of the universe” Student Artwork


“Nature sees us” Student Artwork



“We are part of Nature” Student Artwork



As part of the closure activity, students sent postcards with individual messages to the United Nations.